International Gambling Conference

Preventing harm in the shifting gambling environment: Challenges, Policies & Strategies


10, 11, 12 February 2016

Auckland, New Zealand - Sir Paul Reeves Building AUT University

Thank you to all IGC 2016 speakers and attendees!

about the conference

This well-established biennial event is one of the leading international conferences on problem gambling attracting delegates from New Zealand and around the world.

Be at the forefront of changes in the gambling landscape and be part of a conference featuring compelling workshops and international keynotes.

The conference receives no funding or support from the gambling industry.

The conference aims to enhance the skills of the providers who work in this sector, sharing knowledge about the latest research, public health interventions and treatment techniques, and encouraging national and international collaborations.

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Conference schedule and presentation slides

Search or scroll through presentations and click on a session to see their presentations where made available.

Click here for the online schedule and abstracts
Click here to view poster presentations

Keynote speakers

IGC thanks our keynotes for their wonderful presentations!

Partners

The three partners are delighted to be working together again to bring you this exciting conference where new friendships will be made and new discoveries, initiatives and experiences will be shared to enable us all to progress in minimising the harm caused by gambling.

About US

AUT Gambling and Addictions Research Centre

AUT Gambling and Addictions Research Centre

The Gambling and Addictions Research Centre at AUT University brings together research that improves New Zealanders' understanding of how gambling and addictions affect society, and enhances policy and professional practice.  The Centre aims to: disseminate research-based information through publications, seminars and mass media; advocate evidence-based gambling and addictions policy and service provision; develop and provide education programmes; promote and support postgraduate teaching and research; and work collaboratively with other research organisations and stakeholders.

Study Addictions at AUT

AUT Gambling and Addictions Research Centre
Hāpai Te Hauora Tapui – Maori Public Health

Hāpai Te Hauora Tapui – Maori Public Health

Hāpai Te Hauora is a Maori Public Health organisation governed by Te Whānau o Waipareira, Raukura Hauora o Tainui and Te Runanga o Ngati Whatua. We support community and whānau wellbeing on a local, regional and national level. Since 1996 Hāpai Te Hauora have supported communities to have a voice on issues that affect them and their whānau so that whole communities can be well. Along with our subcontractors (whānau whanui), we also deliver on public health issues including problem gambling, tobacco control, alcohol and other drug harm minimisation, wellchild, nutrition and physical activity. On a day to day basis we also provide infrastructural support to the hauora (health) sector to strengthen public health action: through innovative research, workforce development, public health planning, information technology solutions and policy development. 

Hāpai Te Hauora Tapui – Maori Public Health
Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand

Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand

Our mission is building healthy communities together, free from gambling harm. The Foundation is committed to health promotion that contributes to safer gambling practices through community education, strengthening resilience of people, whanau and communities, and development of safer environments. We are also committed to providing help to those suffering from harm. Qualified counsellors provide free, professional and confidential counselling services for both gamblers and others affected by gambling and a dedicated public health team works on problem gambling issues in the community using a health promotion approach. PGF has the only dedicated Asian services team (Asian Family Services) in New Zealand providing free and confidential counselling, information and education in several languages. Mapu Maia provide a culturally appropriate counselling and support service for Pasifika.

Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand

About the Logo

The three koru or spirals on the conference tohu symbolise all the work that problem gambling services have undertaken in the past, are presently carrying out, and will continue embarking on in the future to prevent gambling harm. Additionally they symbolise the relationship between the three conference organising partners- Hapai Te Hauora Tapui Maori Public Health, the Problem Gambling Foundation of New Zealand, and Auckland University of Technology. The outside kowhaiwhai or pattern on the tohu represents the mangopare or hammerhead shark, which for Maori is a symbol for strength, resilience and determination. Such a symbol fits well with the qualities needed by all problem gambling researchers, policy makers, public health workers, clinicians, communities, indigenous peoples, iwi, hapu, whanau/families to overcome problem gambling both at a local, and a global level.

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